2015 is coming to an end and today, on Thanksgiving’s eve, I’m reflecting on the year and all the ways in which I feel thankful. I’m thankful for the creative surge that I so craved post 2014, thankful for our immensely supportive readers, thankful for the many highs and lows that running a business brings, thankful for my son who has made me realize work comes second to family and thankful for the soon to be new addition to our growing tribe. I’m also thankful for the inspiring collaborators with whom we’ve teamed up to create even the littlest, most momentary moments, like playing in the park with Quincy, feel special and significant. So today, alongside Gap, I’m wishing you and your families a happy and memorable Thanksgiving. And in the spirit of giving back this season, Gap has joined forces with Bombas, a forward thinking athletic-leisure sock company that distributes socks to those in need by donating a pair for every and any pair purchased. Their goal is to achieve 1 million socks donated by December 1st – so that includes Gap socks too. Socks for all, y’all! And again, Happy Thanksgiving!



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Meanwhile on Honestly YUM

Esqueleto Ring Stacks

Lauren Wolf knows how to build a mean ring stack. Not only does the designer dream up her own collection of stunning jewelry, like rough diamonds set in claw like 18k gold settings, she curates an insane selection of jewelry and objects, from other masterly peers, in her Oakland and Los Angeles boutiques Esqueleto. I live only a few minutes from her Temescal Alley outpost and let me tell you, it’s full of eye candy and visits there can be dangerously habit forming. I’m obsessed with with way she mixes vintage pieces with bold pieces from her eponymous collection, as well as those from Johnny Ninos, Bliss Lau, Satomi Kawakita, Mania Mania, and Nick Engel. Mix and match. The combinations are endless. Santa, if you’re reading – all I want for Christmas is an Esqueleto stack. esqueleto


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Garza Marfa Chairs

It’s past midnight in Austin (more on that later!) and I’m sitting here, wide awake in my hotel room, obsessing over these leather chairs that seem to be a ubiquitous fixture in Texas. Turns out, these rustic, yet chic, chairs are the brainchilden of Marfa-based furniture designers Jamey Garza and Constance Holt-Garza. Inspired a pair of weathered Acapulco chairs, the design duo set out to redefine an old classic by making it more elevated and delightfully comfortable with thick, sumptuous saddle leather and customizable powder coated iron frames. Want, need . . .



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DIY Tassel Moccasins

I’ve been wearing Minnetonka moccasins for over a decade. They’re irresistibly comfortable and age so wonderfully over time, molding to my feet in a way that makes me never want to replace them – even though at times, I’ve worn my beloved mocs down to the sole. I should also mention that the simplicity in design makes them the perfect canvas for a DIY project! Inspired by Isabel Marant’s tassel moccasins, and of course, my love of tassels, I made these fun and colorful versions that are perfect for fall. They’re incredibly easy to make and if you’re able to track down enough leather remnants, you can change the tassels out depending on color and abundance!

Don’t be intimidated about picking out leather to make your tassels. Etsy is a great resource and there are lots of suppliers getting rid of assorted bags of leather scraps and remnants. The longest tassel will measure approximately 3 x 3 inches. Multiply that by 2 and the largest remnant you’ll need is a 6 x 3 inch piece. The smallest tassel will measure 2 x 3 inches. Multiply that by 2 and the smallest remnant you’ll need is a 4 x 3 inch piece. Most sellers will provide rough estimates of the sizes of leather remnants.

You’ll need:

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Ancient Stepwells of India

I recently stumbled upon a photo of what looked like a reverse temple and had to investigate. It was a stepwell. A stepwell is exactly what it sounds like: steps down to a well. The earliest stepwells date back to about 550 AD and were developed in India as a necessity for areas suffering from torrential seasonal monsoons. Many of these functional structures were commissioned by wealthy or powerful philanthropists (nearly a fourth of whom were said to be women) as spiritual, earthbound bastions built to last for an eternity. I mean, how stunning are these pieces of forgotten architecture? And could you imagine carrying a buckets of water up all those stairs?!





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